A short summary of antigone a play by sophocles

She must not waste her life and its happiness. The Messenger delivers the news: The father and son argue, Haemon accusing Creon of arrogance, and Creon accusing Haemon of unmanly weakness in siding with a woman.

Creon howled for the slaves to remove the stones. Tiresias warns Creon that Polyneices should now be urgently buried because the gods are displeased, refusing to accept any sacrifices or prayers from Thebes.

As the play progresses they counsel Creon to be more moderate.

Summary of Sophocles' Antigone

In prohibiting the people of Thebes from burying Polyneices, Creon is essentially placing him on the level of the other attackers—the foreign Argives. But Creon is as unyielding in his allegiance to the rule of law as Antigone is to the unwritten traditional rules of the gods.

While he rejects Antigone's actions based on family honor, Creon appears to value family himself. And so, despite his precautions, the prophecy that Oedipus dreaded has actually come true.

A sickness plagues Thebes, and neighboring cities bear Thebes ill will. Creon decides to spare Ismene and to bury Antigone alive in a cave. Creon is the current King of Thebes, who views law as the guarantor of personal happiness. Man is deinon in the sense that he is the terrible, violent one, and also in the sense that he uses violence against the overpowering.

HaemonCreon's son, enters to pledge allegiance to his father, even though he is engaged to Antigone. Realizing that he has killed his father and married his mother, Oedipus is agonized by his fate.

Antigone Summary

Oedipus has already sent his brother-in-law, Creon, to the oracle to learn what to do. She argues unflinchingly with Creon about the immorality of the edict and the morality of her actions.

Creon sends the guards out. Man is twice deinon. Those two lines are so fundamental that the rest of the verse is spent catching up with them.

The Oedipus Trilogy

Ismene swears she will bury Polynices herself then. His argument says that had Antigone not been so obsessed with the idea of keeping her brother covered, none of the deaths of the play would have happened. Antigone has hanged herself and Haemon, in desperate agony, kills himself as well.

Creon, furious, orders the sentry to find the culprit or face death himself. Tiresiasthe blind prophet, enters. As the play progresses they counsel Creon to be more moderate. Creon questions her after sending the sentry away, and she does not deny what she has done.

In the opening scene, she makes an emotional appeal to her sister Ismene saying that they must protect their brother out of sisterly love, even if he did betray their state.

Creon blames himself for everything that has happened, and, a broken man, he asks his servants to help him inside. It is not clear how he would personally handle these two values in conflict, but it is a moot point in the play, for, as absolute ruler of Thebes, Creon is the state, and the state is Creon.

Rose maintains that the solution to the problem of the second burial is solved by close examination of Antigone as a tragic character. When he discovers that Antigone, his niece, has defied his order, Creon is furious. Athenians, proud of their democratic tradition, would have identified his error in the many lines of dialogue which emphasize that the people of Thebes believe he is wrong, but have no voice to tell him so.

Another worry haunts Oedipus. Haemon then stabbed himself and lay beside Antigone in a pool of blood.Antigone is engaged to Creon's son, Haemon, and the two of them are very much in love. But Creon is as unyielding in his allegiance to the rule of law as Antigone is to the unwritten traditional rules of the gods.

From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Antigone Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays. Play Summary Antigone Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List Polynices and his brother Eteocles, however, are both dead, killed by each other, according to the curse of Oedipus, their father.

Free summary and analysis of the events in Sophocles's Antigone that won't make you snore. We promise. Antigone (/ æ n ˈ t ɪ ɡ ə n i / ann-TIG-ə-nee; Ancient Greek: Ἀντιγόνη) is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before BC.

Of the three Theban plays Antigone is the third in order of the events depicted in the plays, but it is the first that was written.

The Oedipus Trilogy

The play expands on the Theban legend that predates it, and it picks up where Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes ends. Antigone study guide contains a biography of Sophocles, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

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A short summary of antigone a play by sophocles
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